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Displaying 0 to 13 of 13
Kaff
Kaff
Rating:2.7  
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very small village (derogative), from hebrew "kfar" over yiddish, superlative is "Kuhkaff" (="Cowvillage", ie only cows live there - for obvious reasons)
walking on eggshells
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Kamuff
Kamuff
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"Camel", friendly, affectionary designation for somebody with slow comprehension, Magdeburgian area
Affectionary isn't a word. Dolt. Comment by: Blah   
I think affectionary or another word with similar meaning is about be made this is going to describe something relating to people and how they interact. Comment by: niche   
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keimig
keimig
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idiot
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keimig
keimig
Posted by: Bruce
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disgusting, rank
Something that is dirty can be called "keimig". "Igitt ist das keimig!" Comment by: Aki   
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Kies
Kies
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Standard German: gravel, slang: money (English slang dough)
Schotter
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Knete
Knete
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Standard German: Plasticine, slang: money (English slang dough)
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Knete
Knete
Posted by: Fnordius
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Dough or modelling clay; slang for money
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Kohle
Kohle
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Standard German: coal, slang: money (English slang dough)
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Kokolores, kokolores reden
Kokolores, kokolores reden
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Silly things. Speaking silly things in a hurried way; speaking badly thought things in abreathless way. It comes fron Cocaine users (german: Kokain; slang 'Koks') who tend to tell their drug-induced wisdoms to a rarely impressed world.
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Kokolores, to speak Kokolores, Coke-lore (?)
Kokolores, kokolores reden
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Posted by: rossi
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Speaking silly things in a hurried way; speaking badly thought things in abreathless way. It comes fron Cocaine users (german: Kokain; slang 'Koks') who tend to tell their drug-induced wisdoms to a rarely impressed world.
Although I didn't know it has been linked to speaking under influence of cocaine, which may have been up to date speech in the 30's, today it is not in any way connected thereto. It is used like "fuss" "nonsense". Comment by: Aki   
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Koks
Koks
Posted by: Fnordius
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"Koks" is German slang for cocaine, but also means heating coal, much like "coke" in English.
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Krone, einen in der Krone haben
Krone, einen in der Krone haben
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Posted by: rossi
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"Ich habe einen in der Krone" means: I was very drunken yesterday; I am drunk. Literally translated: "I had something into my crown". Heritage unknown, presumably 'having something in/on my head like a crown'. No direct translation known to me.
"Der hat Einen in der Krone" is normally used as the phrase. That means: He drank too much; between being tipsy and being drunk; slightly slurred speech. The person referred to (der) is probably no longer able to self-diagnose. > "Gestern Abend hatte ich Einen in der Krone" means: Last night I had too much to drink. > Very drunk is "besoffen"; when the task of "besaufen" is already accomplished (past). When someone is in the process of "saufen (humans "trink", animals "saufen)" is considered animalistic. Comment by: rwssr   
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Krone, Zacken aus der Krone fallen/brechen
Krone, Zacken aus der Krone fallen/brechen
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Posted by: rossi
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If an arrogant person denies a wish due to fear of losing respect or honour. Used in an ironic way; alleges someone is too fine/pretty/dignified to fulfil some bidding. Heritage: Presumable from the picture of a king diminished in respect because a spike 'Zacken' misses in his crown.
Also used as: "Da wird Dir doch kein Stein aus der Krone fallen" meaning: The approval nod most certainly will not dislocate one diamond out of your crown. > Very offensive! Comment by: rwssr   
"Du brichst dir keinen Zacken aus der Krone, wenn... (du den Müll runterbringst/ du den Abwasch machst/ du dein Zimmer alleine aufräumst)!" (Parents use to say that in a reproachful voice to kids unwilling to help them, but it's not very nice.) Comment by: Aki   
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