Sitemap CoolSlang is Hiring!
Canadian Slang Dictionary
Google
American English slang British slang Canadian slang Australian slang French slang German slang Hindi slang Japanese slang Korean slang Norwegian slang Persian slang Serbian slang Turkish slang
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Displaying 0 to 16 of 16
Cancer Cage
Canada flag
Details
A segregated room in a bar or restaurant for smoking tobacco. When anti-smoking laws were passed in Ontario, many bars, restaurants, and coffee shops installed special rooms where people could smoke, away from the other patrons. Known for their dense atmosphere and the short life expectancy of their occupants.
See All CommentsPost CommentReport Abuse Add to Canadian Slang Dictionary
Canuck
Canada flag
Posted by: Canuck Wordsmith
Details
A Canadian. Once often used disparagingly; now a proud label, e.g. "Vancouver Canucks"

A shortening of the Canadian symbol for Canada- Johny Canuck. The UK has John Bull. The USA has Uncle Sam and Canada has Johny Canuck. Probably started by Can. soldier in WW1as a collective. Used extensively by Gov't on posters to advertise and get immigrants from Europe to accept offers of free land in 'the last great west.'(ie. Western provinces). Johny Canuck is a young healthy male standing tall and free. He wears jodpurs, high leather 'mountie' boots, an open check lumberjack shirt, and a wide stetson hat. A great symbol too little used. Comment by: TED BOYLE

"Captain Canuck is in a race against the clock to save Parliament Hill on Canada Day."
was is really used disparagingly? Comment by: adam   
it was never an insult..it was a term created by american soldiers during the war who'd go to pub's overseas and meet up with and often get into drunken fights with canadian soldiers..and promptly get thier butts whupped..and the yanks would say.."dont muck with a canuck" Comment by: Rob   
The word was used in the states to refer to french canadians, mainly in the southern states and was considered an insult Comment by: Tom   
I've heard it used both ways. Good or bad. Comment by: Sylvia   
Hardly ever used on the Sunshine Coast (BC). Most people don't know we're called that, they just think it has to do with the Vancouver Canucks :/ American ignorance rubs off too much here.. Comment by: Tosh   
Used insultingly by New Englanders (US) to refer to French Canadians. Comment by: Stu   
See All CommentsPost CommentReport Abuse Add to Canadian Slang Dictionary
Canuck Wheel
Canada flag
Posted by: Mack
Details
Canadian Tire, a big box store in Canada which specializes in car stuff but now sells everything (see also "Crappy Tire"
See All CommentsPost CommentReport Abuse Add to Canadian Slang Dictionary
canucklehead
Canada flag
Posted by: tarapotoRating:3.0  
Details
A noun used, somewhat derogatorily as a term for a fan of the Vancouver Canucks ice hockey club. Mostly used by fans of other Canadian clubs
a cucklehead is someone who isn't that smart or did something stupid Comment by: maddy   
Canucks fans call themselves [ca]nuckleheads all the time. ("I'm a nucklehead, through and through.") We really don't care if other fans mean it in a derogatory way. If it distinguishes us as true Canucks fans, we're all for it. Comment by: Gina    Rated:3/5
I've seen this used in a bunch of ways, but the oldest place was the issue of the old X-Men comics preluding the dark phoenix saga where cyclops and Marvel Girl/Phoenix (Jean Grey) got married and wolverine (Logan), (the only Canadian X-Man) wrote a note referring to himself as a 'canucklehead' but that was as a joke. So it can be used both ways, as an insult or as a compliment. I personally use it as a compliment. Comment by: Mel    Rated:3/5
ummm, www.canucklehead.ca anyone? Comment by: canucklehead    Rated:5/5
I find it very interesting and funny Comment by: someone    Rated:4/5
See All CommentsPost CommentReport Abuse Add to Canadian Slang Dictionary
Cariboozer
Canada flag
Posted by: Mack
Details
A native of Cariboo Country, BC
See All CommentsPost CommentReport Abuse Add to Canadian Slang Dictionary
Celly
Canada flag
Posted by: Mack
Details
(Hockey) Celebration after a goal
See All CommentsPost CommentReport Abuse Add to Canadian Slang Dictionary
Chate
Canada flag
Rating:1.0  
Details
to be ripped off. Example in reference to being ripped off in a marijuana transaction: 'That guy chated me a 0.5. Also used in any way someone uses 'gay' (ie, thats so 'gay' becomes, that's so chate).
"It may have been a reference to a hockey move, he contemplates now, as he was something of an enforcer on the ice, and may have "chated" his opponents by shutting down their plays." [from the Web How a boy's name became slang by National Post]
originated at a local high school in oakville ON and is used localy and no other towns use it Comment by: oakville guy   
This slang is obsolete and old-school. If you use it you will be laughed at and ridiculed! Comment by: John Chate    Rated:3/5
Nowadays we say chinced. Comment by: Johnny   
See All CommentsPost CommentReport Abuse Add to Canadian Slang Dictionary
Chesterfield
Canada flag
Rating:0.7  
Details
Couch, sofa. Named after Lord Chesterfield, supposedly the first to saw off the arms off armchairs of three chairs and put them together, and wa-la, a chesterfield
"I believe in peackeeping not policing. Diversity not assimilation and that the beaver is a truley proud and noble animal. A toque is a hat, a chesterfield is a couch. And it is pronounced "zed", not "zee"." [from the Song I Am Canadian by Molson]
Only old people use this term. Comment by: Jarrod   
definitely not true Comment by: james   
I used this when i was a kid! lol which wasnt tht long ago... Comment by: emmamarie   
Never heard of it before. Comment by: Bob Joe    Rated:1/5
An old brand of cigarrets in USA..my grandfather smoked...first brand i smoked after stealing one at age 8 Comment by: bob martin   
I grew up using "Chesterfield"....possible validation of the "old people" comment. I miss it as it distinguishes Canadians. "Sofa" is unacceptable! Seems "couch" is what we've adapted to. Comment by: Jo-Ann   
See All CommentsPost CommentReport Abuse Add to Canadian Slang Dictionary
chinook
Canada flag
Posted by: tarapotoRating:1.1  
Details
Comes from some native language, and refers to a warm westerly wind that blows east from British Columbia over the Rocky Mountains and blankets the foothills with warmth, changing the temperature rapidly. Sometimes the change can be extreme, maybe even rising 15 degrees in a quarter of an hour. The saying in Calgary is "If you don't like the weather in Calgary, wait a few minutes".
Chinook was a pidgin trading language in BC. There are so many native groups and languages here it was developed to trade across the province. Comment by: Sweet Trav   
The Term is said about Alberta as a whole not just Calgary!! Comment by: Tayler   
I live in BC and I've only ever heard chinook used to describe the huge salmon in our rivers. I love how the description says "some native language" though. too funny. Comment by: Gina    Rated:3/5
true name of the king salmon Comment by: alaska rat   
The same thing happens in central Europe when a warm southerly wind spills down from the Alps into the Tyrol area of Germany and Austria. Over there it's called a "fohn" pronounced foon. Comment by: Whitbydave   
Actually Edmonton doesn't get the Chinook, only the warming effects. A Chinook wind only occurs in 4 places in the world, Southern Alberta, Colorado, Europe (as mentioned already) and the Sahara desert if memory serves... The Chinook effect is actually the changing of the ions in the air mass not just the warming of the temperatures... Comment by: R00B0y    Rated:3/5
See All CommentsPost CommentReport Abuse Add to Canadian Slang Dictionary
Cockknocker
Canada flag
Details
Someone who is not worthy of associating with the general population. A criminal sometimes, an asshole all the time.
See All CommentsPost CommentReport Abuse Add to Canadian Slang Dictionary
Cooked It
Canada flag
Posted by: PrairieRating:0.8  
Details
Something done wrong. Something wrecked or having been mangled in some manner. It is a variation of describing something as being wrecked (cooked). Circa early 1970's, perhaps 1960's.
"He/She cooked it."
rowena: I grew up in ottawa and I've heard "cooked it", as well as "overcooking" something. It's not extremely common but it's in use. Comment by: Sam   
Another variation is "sold the farm" Comment by: silentjay    Rated:2/5
Im from N.B and it's used here quite often! Comment by: Lesleigh   
In Australia we would use this to describe what happens when your car over heats and you damage the motor. Comment by: Ian   
I grew up and live in northern Alberta, I use "cooked" regarding broken equipment, mechanical things, electronics. Anytiem something breaks down and is beyond repair. it's f***in cooked! I hear it a lot around here. Comment by: Justin    Rated:5/5
I'm from Toronto, and I've never heard this one. Comment by: Jennifer   
See All CommentsPost CommentReport Abuse Add to Canadian Slang Dictionary
cop a 'za
Canada flag
Rating:5.0  
Details
To go get a pizza. For example, "after we had some beers, we thought coppin' a 'za would be a good idea". Used in Montreal in the 1970's to 1990's.
pizza is yummy. very yummy. i am eating pizza right now. it is yummy. Comment by: Niya    Rated:5/5
See All CommentsPost CommentReport Abuse Add to Canadian Slang Dictionary
Cougar
Canada flag
Posted by: TripsRating:1.0  
Details
An older woman trying to attract a younger man. (That cougar was flirting with me) Also a Mountain Lion
"Strut it lady, like you mean it. Show the kittens how it's done. Claw me baby, like you need it. Show me how a cougar hunts." [from the Song To Catch a Cougar by Cold Forty Three]
I was under the impression that "Cougar" simply referred to a single woman over the age of...40 or whatever. Comment by: Zabet    Rated:3/5
Who remembers the first time they heard cougar used to describe an older woman trying to get with a younger man because I have a deep theory that it originated in Victoria, B.C. circa 1990 and that Sweetwaters was the first "den." Can anyone back me up? Comment by: foreignowl   
I've heard this used since I was young, around four-five, which was 10-11 years ago. Comment by: .....    Rated:3/5
we call them mutton over in england, as in mutton dressed as lamb. same meaning, old girl trying to attract young males Comment by: paddylatic   
cougar bate, a guy trying to pick up a cougar for lesson in "Knocking-boots" Comment by: davee   
Zabat, that "cougar" has been in use since way before 1990... Comment by: Me   
See All CommentsPost CommentReport Abuse Add to Canadian Slang Dictionary
coulee
Canada flag
Details
..a small valley
poooooooooooooooop Comment by: Niya   
See All CommentsPost CommentReport Abuse Add to Canadian Slang Dictionary
cowtown
Canada flag
Posted by: tarapotoRating:1.3  
Details
Mostly used by outsiders to refer to the city of Calgary, but it is occasionally used by the locals as well. Calgary is surrounded by many ranches and has a large cattle industry and a long rodeo history, which is celebrated yearly at the Calgary Stampede, and that is probably how the town got the nick name
totally agree, alberta is ran with cow-type people, and drugs. besides, the calgary stampede is well, in calgary. i've never heard of it before, but i wouldn't be surprised if it's actually used. xD Comment by: carissa!    Rated:5/5
i hate this expression! no one in calgary is actually a cowboy. its stereotypical. and fyi, most residents leave town during stampede week Comment by: Eliza   
i'm from just south of cowtown, it's been cowtown to folks across the western states and western canada since i was a kid, and that's been a long while. people don't leave cowtown for the stampede, don't know where you EVER heard that. may not live in cowtown now, but it's a great name for a great city Comment by: annie   
im from N.B and the lil town of sussex is called cowtown, lots of farms and cowboys there! Comment by: becki    Rated:5/5
People DO indeed leave the city during stampede week, the city gets flooded with tourists, motor homes and it's generally a big pain in the ass. I know many people who take that week off and go somewhere more quiet. And the drugs here in Alberta are no different then any other province/city. Look at Vancouver, I bet there are far more drugs in Vancouver then there is in Calgary! Comment by: cowtowngal   
Cowtown is also used to refer to Fort Worth, Texas because of the stockyards there. Comment by: Molly   
See All CommentsPost CommentReport Abuse Add to Canadian Slang Dictionary
Crappy Tire
Canada flag
Rating:5.0  
Details
Canadian Tire!! Nationwide and we all know what it means!!
"Crappy Tire: the last refuge of man." [from the Song Canadian Tire by Astronaut Chris Hadfield]
If you Google "Crappy Tire", Canadian Tire come up first! Comment by: Young Diefenbaker    Rated:5/5
See All CommentsPost CommentReport Abuse Add to Canadian Slang Dictionary
Displaying Slang in

 
 

26 visitors online © 2004, 2007, 2012 by CoolSlang