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Displaying 0 to 11 of 11
Gander
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Posted by: Mack
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take a look
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gay young boys
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gay young boys
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gear
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marijauna
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git
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Rating:3.0  
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Nowadays a milder insult, usually to a male. Someone quite nasty or who is unpleasant. Mean GIT, old GIT, nasty GIT. Can also be used in a more positive fashion..you lucky git etc.
someone who was being very stupid or has dne something realy dumb also coul mean a goofball Comment by: Joe    Rated:3/5
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Gob
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Posted by: Mack
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mouth, "Shut your Gob!"
gob gob goble goble Comment by: Matthew   
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gobshite
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a shit talker
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Gobsmacked
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Posted by: Mack
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Speechless, dumbfounded
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Gogglebox
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Television
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Goolies
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"balls", testicles
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Grockle
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Rating:0.8  
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A Tourist. (mainly used in southern England)
Grockle is not even English, let alone southern English. I don't know where you found it, mate, but it wasn't from here. Comment by: Zu   
Origin appears to be from Torquey in Devon. Not in general use elsewhere in England. Comment by: Gc   
Grockle was a term used on the Isle of Wight to describe holidaymakers when I was young. Comment by: NB    Rated:3/5
Grockle is used in common parlance nowadays; means chavvier than a muggle. Like our neighbours who leave their snotty children's scooters out by the front door of the common drive. Comment by: Phaser   
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Gubbin
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Getting thumped, battered
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