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Displaying 0 to 11 of 11
Cabbaged
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Broken, dysfunctional.
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cat on hot bricks
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Rating:1.1  
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English expression similar to the American expression "cat on a hot tin roof". Indicates a person ill at ease or uncomfortable.
I have never heard this said before. the Cat on a tin roof. that is soooo weird Comment by: Jennifer    Rated:2/5
my grand mom said this to me"hurry up phylum, your uncle is coming home tonight, he's from the hospital and he wants somebody to look(meaning to standby for him)at him while he's asleep..he's like you know, cat on hot bricks(agonizing) go on now! fix his room, ok?" Comment by: chrisophylum calleza    Rated:3/5
I think "cat on a hot tin roof" is an expression most Americans,(those unfamiliar with Tennesee Williams or not from the south) won't recognize. Great explanation of the analogy, though. Comment by: KrisM    Rated:4/5
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cat_on_a_Hot_Tin_R oof I'm familiar with the movie but have never heard anyone say it as an expression apart from that. Comment by: Kathy   
Never heard of "cat on hot bricks" but "cat on a hot tin roof" is very popular, in the south or not. I don't even know what the movie is about, but the phrase is very common in Ohio. Comment by: DiGi   
I've never been to the south, and I'm not familiar with Tennessee Williams, but I'm very familiar with "cat on a hot tin roof". You don't have to know the origin of a phrase to know the phrase and use it. Comment by: Downstrike   
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Cattle trucked
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.............rhyming slang, very tired!
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Chav
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A young person from the lower social classes - often seen wearing trackies and fake burberry baseball caps. other uses are "chavtastic" and "it's a chavalanche in here".
This one was explained to me as an acronym for Council House (Housing) Associated Vermin. Council Housing being a generic term for Cheap rented dwellings run by the local authority. Sometimes it implies a low intellect or poor education. Comment by: NB   
The acronym "CHAV" is a "backronym" and has nothing to do with the etymology (which comes from the Romani for "child" iirc) it comes from the same direction as "pikey" (which also has gypsy routes). Chav ALWAYS implies low intellect & poor education - it is a pejorative term. Comment by: Kay   
Also means Council Housed And Violent. Comment by: HM   
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chelp ; chelp off
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Rating:0.3  
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(Yorkshire) to disagree vocally with someone without sufficient grounds to do so i.e. "he chelped off at me." Chelping is commonly used in Yorkshire. Usually in reference to someone, often a child, who is nattering on about something or talking back. To be chelped off is to be put out about something, a bit like being miffed! Comment by: Maureen Cruickshank
"Londoners are chelpin' on about Northern English slang being included in a British slang dictionary!"
I'm 18 Born and raised in Cambridgeshire, never ever heard that shit. Thats a load of rubbish mate! Comment by: Matt    Rated:1/5
'Chelping' is the slang used when a person is constantly pestering for something. E.g. a child wanting an ice cream. I'm from Yorkshire and know the word well... Comment by: Gordon   
Yorkshire slang shouldn't be included on here....their colloquialisms are erm a little off from the rest of the uk Comment by: kcs   
"chelp" is used extenively in the North and Midlands, it's a verb which means "making noises of complaint or disagreement" and it's hardly surprising that Southerners think the only valid words are ones that they themselves use. I bet they don't use "mythering" (pestering like midges or children) or "slaumed up" (covered or coated in mess) either, so would that make them superior, or show them to have an inferior vocabulary? And as for "nesh" (unable to stand cold weather) I'd better not get started. Comment by: chelpman   
I've lived in the midlands for 20 years and never heard this phrase. I've also lived in the north east and the north west and never heard it there either. What a load of bollocks (see above). Comment by: Ewan    Rated:1/5
Seriously, would you ever take as a reasoned and informed comment the sort of ill-spelt and unnecessarily vulgar contributions from the likes of Mo ["begginning"], bob ["thats", "usefull", "sight" (= site)], Matt and others? Comment by: grumpy pedant    Rated:2/5
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chewing carpet?
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eating pussy
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chosty
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real nice
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Chuffed
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Pleasantly pleased with one's performance. Used in England. "I was quite chuffed with myself afterwards; I didn't think I could do it." Verb. Pronounced Chuff-ed, the u is pronounced the same as ruff (a dog's bark).
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chunter; chuntering
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to chunter on, or chuntering on. applied to someone who's mouth is running away with them, i.e. talking rubbish that no-one else is interested in. It might be North-Eastern (both myself and my mother are Geordies) but I'm not sure - even heard it on the BBC the other day!
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Cockup
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Posted by: Mack
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botch, a messed up situation
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Confuddled
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Posted by: bunniRating:0.8  
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Confused
AMAZING HAILIE Comment by: bob    Rated:5/5
Confuzzled - Whinnie the Pooh Comment by: Kathy   
Cerfuddled is another term meaning the same thing. Slang in Canada. Comment by: Shawna   
use it all the time even though im a canadian Comment by: rikki   
yes...very common in Canada to say that you're buggered for thought Comment by: 71CANADIAN   
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